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Eat Raw Turnips at the Final Jamaica Farmers Market of the Season

If you want to stock up on some fresh vegetables before winter, this is your last chance to hit the Jamaica Farmers Market.

On Friday and Saturday, the market will set up for its last two days of the season, offering free samples of root vegetables.

During the event, market-goers will get to try several raw vegetables that are currently in season and do not require cooking, including turnip, watermelon radish and kohlrabi, a sweeter kind of cabbage heart, the organizers said.

“We want people to try something new, like kohlrabi,” said Dagmar Kostkova of Down to Earth Markets, which recruits farmers for the market. “It’s delicious and very juicy, but people don’t know it very well.”

Kostkova added that the goal is to make people “more aware about the season and what they can eat in the winter, as the season of root vegetables is starting.” Read more

Election of Judge Robinson to ICJ a proud moment for all Jamaicans

JAMAICAN jurist Patrick Robinson’s election to serve as a judge in the International Court of Justice (ICJ), for a nine-year period beginning in February 2015, is a singular moment of pride for all Jamaicans.

Judge Robinson is the only Jamaican and the second Caribbean person to serve on the ICJ in its 70-year history. His election caps a distinguished legal career both on behalf of Jamaica and in hemispheric and international legal fora.

From 2008 to 2011, he was president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, having served the Tribunal as a member from 1998. In 2004, he presided over the trial of Slobodan Milosevic, the former Yugoslav president and the first former head of state to be tried for war crimes. Read more

Ganja decriminalisation brings ‘war on drugs’ to Jamaica

JAMAICA’S decriminalisation of ganja has placed the island in the centre of activities related to the ‘war on drugs’, ahead of the critical United Nations General Assembly (UNGASS) where fire works is expected when the issue is discussed in 2016.

Last week, two of the leading organisations preparing the ground for changes in the rules governing drug control, spent several days in Jamaica and addressed a symposium on “The International War on Drugs: The Road to UNGASS 2016″ held at the Mona Visitor’s Lodge in Kingston.

Hannah Hetzer, policy manager, the Americas for the New York-based Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) said Jamaica was now one of the countries the world was looking at after two major developments — the decision by the Government to decriminalise small amounts of ganja and the Mario Deane case in which the young man was jailed for having a ganja spliff and subsequently beaten to death in a cell at the Barnett Street police station in Montego Bay, St James.

“The world is looking at Jamaica to be a pioneer in drug reform in the Caribbean,” Hetzer told the Jamaica Observer, underscoring the country’s important role in the Caricom Commission now studying marijuana reform.

“We are seeing an increasing momentum towards drug policy reform in the Americas, especially where marijuana is concerned,” said Hetzer who worked on the successful campaign to get ganja legalised in Uruguay, the first country to do so. In this regard she credited developments in the US where up to last week the states of Alaska, Oregon and the District of Columbia (Washington DC) had joined Colorado and Washington in legalising medical marijuana.

She argued that the Caribbean, led by Jamaica, could get in “the forefront of a trend in a world in which legalisation was becoming the preferred option to prohibition”. Jamaica could also emerge as a leader in medical marijuana research, she said, adding that products from ganja were being used to treat various medical conditions including epilepsy; multiple sclerosis; nausea; chemotherapy and post traumatic stress disorder, among others.

Steve Rolles, senior policy analyst at Bristol, United Kingston-based Transform Drug Policy Foundation (TDPF) came to Jamaica on the invitation of the University of the West Indies Centre for Leadership and Governance and the Open Society Foundations which sponsored the symposium, to speak about his organisation’s vision of what the world would look like after the war on drugs. A lack of such a vision had stalled the earlier debate on the drug war, he said. Read more

On the “A” w/Souleo: Jamaican Dancehall Culture Gets The Visual Treatment

Wi lickle but wi tallawah

It is a common expression in Jamaica that means despite its small physical size the island of Jamaica is powerful, fearless and strong-willed. Visual artist Andre Woolery has taken inspiration from that saying for his latest collection, Freedom of Expression, Jamaica. The works focus on celebrating the island’s creativity through portraits of youth engaged in Jamaican dancehall culture, a phenomenon known for its up-tempo music and colorful ensembles donned by its supporters.

Against backdrops of predominantly neutral tones, Woolery applies striking colors that capture the boldness, vibrancy and eclectic style of Jamaica’s youth. In a country listed as having the sixth highest homicide rate in the world and where 1.1 million people live below the poverty line, Woolery believes dancehall youth find empowerment through their sartorial choices. Furthermore he hopes that their images broaden the perception of Jamaica.

Woolery–who grew up between Morristown, NJ and St. Ann, Jamaica–will have one of the pieces from the series on display at the National Gallery of Jamaica’s 2014 Jamaica Biennial beginning December 7.

Read more at: Huffington Post

Anita Antoinette Proudly Sings for Jamaica on The Voice

She did her family – and her native land – proud.

Kingston, Jamaica, native Anita Antoinette stepped up to honor her island-nation homeland Monday on The Voice, delivering a theatrical and spirited performance of Bob Marley’s “Redemption Song” as her mother – who brought the family to the U.S. for a better life – looked on in wonder.

“You gotta be proud,” Adam Levine told her amid cheers afterward, noting Antoinette’s obvious talent and the importance of sharing Marley’s message of freedom to the world.

“Tonight, you get to be that ambassador to Jamaica,” Levine said.

Antoinette’s coach, Gwen Stefani, no small fan of the island nation herself – she named her first son Kingston – was similarly caught up in the singer’s reggae stardust.

“It was authentic, it was beautiful, and it was true,” she said. “I just feel blessed to be a part of it.”

Antoinette’s singing capped two hours of solid performances, as The Voice’s final dozen artists took to the stage, hoping to impress viewers who will whittle the group down to 10.

Likely earning a ticket back next week was soulful Chris Jamison, who had a serious pop star moment singing Nick Jonas’s “Jealous” for Team Adam.

Wearing a black suit and tie that showed off his sleek frame, Jamison worked the stage like a junior Justin Timberlake in a musical moment that seemed a perfect fit for his groove and easy falsetto.

Anita Antoinette Proudly Sings for Jamaica on The Voice
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By Andrea Billups
@princessmouse

11/18/2014 AT 07:50 AM EST

She did her family – and her native land – proud.

Kingston, Jamaica, native Anita Antoinette stepped up to honor her island-nation homeland Monday on The Voice, delivering a theatrical and spirited performance of Bob Marley’s “Redemption Song” as her mother – who brought the family to the U.S. for a better life – looked on in wonder.

“You gotta be proud,” Adam Levine told her amid cheers afterward, noting Antoinette’s obvious talent and the importance of sharing Marley’s message of freedom to the world.

“Tonight, you get to be that ambassador to Jamaica,” Levine said.

Antoinette’s coach, Gwen Stefani, no small fan of the island nation herself – she named her first son Kingston – was similarly caught up in the singer’s reggae stardust.

“It was authentic, it was beautiful, and it was true,” she said. “I just feel blessed to be a part of it.”

Antoinette’s singing capped two hours of solid performances, as The Voice’s final dozen artists took to the stage, hoping to impress viewers who will whittle the group down to 10.

Likely earning a ticket back next week was soulful Chris Jamison, who had a serious pop star moment singing Nick Jonas’s “Jealous” for Team Adam.

Wearing a black suit and tie that showed off his sleek frame, Jamison worked the stage like a junior Justin Timberlake in a musical moment that seemed a perfect fit for his groove and easy falsetto.

Loving it perhaps the most were the ladies in the crowd, who voiced their approval and would not let up.

“It just showed all the strength of your voice,” Stefani told Jamison. “The screaming in here was so loud, I think I have permanent damage!”

Levine, acknowledging Jamison’s hot looks, was jazzed as his artist had his best performance of the season and opened a lane for himself moving ahead. “Yeah, you’re cute all right … but you’re a talented, talented singer,” Levine enthused.

Other early Season 7 standouts also kept their stock high, including Blake Shelton’s Southern rocker Craig Wayne Boyd. He showed he could helm some classic country on George Strait’s ballad of longing, “You Look So Good in Love.”

Shelton hoped the quieter song would showcase a more tender side of the hunky artist, and Boyd did not disappoint. Even Pharrell Williams stood up to acknowledge the moment. “It was such a clean, super-professional performance,” he told Boyd, as Stefani and Shelton also acknowledged his skill.