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On the “A” w/Souleo: Jamaican Dancehall Culture Gets The Visual Treatment

Wi lickle but wi tallawah

It is a common expression in Jamaica that means despite its small physical size the island of Jamaica is powerful, fearless and strong-willed. Visual artist Andre Woolery has taken inspiration from that saying for his latest collection, Freedom of Expression, Jamaica. The works focus on celebrating the island’s creativity through portraits of youth engaged in Jamaican dancehall culture, a phenomenon known for its up-tempo music and colorful ensembles donned by its supporters.

Against backdrops of predominantly neutral tones, Woolery applies striking colors that capture the boldness, vibrancy and eclectic style of Jamaica’s youth. In a country listed as having the sixth highest homicide rate in the world and where 1.1 million people live below the poverty line, Woolery believes dancehall youth find empowerment through their sartorial choices. Furthermore he hopes that their images broaden the perception of Jamaica.

Woolery–who grew up between Morristown, NJ and St. Ann, Jamaica–will have one of the pieces from the series on display at the National Gallery of Jamaica’s 2014 Jamaica Biennial beginning December 7.

Read more at: Huffington Post

Anita Antoinette Proudly Sings for Jamaica on The Voice

She did her family – and her native land – proud.

Kingston, Jamaica, native Anita Antoinette stepped up to honor her island-nation homeland Monday on The Voice, delivering a theatrical and spirited performance of Bob Marley’s “Redemption Song” as her mother – who brought the family to the U.S. for a better life – looked on in wonder.

“You gotta be proud,” Adam Levine told her amid cheers afterward, noting Antoinette’s obvious talent and the importance of sharing Marley’s message of freedom to the world.

“Tonight, you get to be that ambassador to Jamaica,” Levine said.

Antoinette’s coach, Gwen Stefani, no small fan of the island nation herself – she named her first son Kingston – was similarly caught up in the singer’s reggae stardust.

“It was authentic, it was beautiful, and it was true,” she said. “I just feel blessed to be a part of it.”

Antoinette’s singing capped two hours of solid performances, as The Voice’s final dozen artists took to the stage, hoping to impress viewers who will whittle the group down to 10.

Likely earning a ticket back next week was soulful Chris Jamison, who had a serious pop star moment singing Nick Jonas’s “Jealous” for Team Adam.

Wearing a black suit and tie that showed off his sleek frame, Jamison worked the stage like a junior Justin Timberlake in a musical moment that seemed a perfect fit for his groove and easy falsetto.

Anita Antoinette Proudly Sings for Jamaica on The Voice
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By Andrea Billups
@princessmouse

11/18/2014 AT 07:50 AM EST

She did her family – and her native land – proud.

Kingston, Jamaica, native Anita Antoinette stepped up to honor her island-nation homeland Monday on The Voice, delivering a theatrical and spirited performance of Bob Marley’s “Redemption Song” as her mother – who brought the family to the U.S. for a better life – looked on in wonder.

“You gotta be proud,” Adam Levine told her amid cheers afterward, noting Antoinette’s obvious talent and the importance of sharing Marley’s message of freedom to the world.

“Tonight, you get to be that ambassador to Jamaica,” Levine said.

Antoinette’s coach, Gwen Stefani, no small fan of the island nation herself – she named her first son Kingston – was similarly caught up in the singer’s reggae stardust.

“It was authentic, it was beautiful, and it was true,” she said. “I just feel blessed to be a part of it.”

Antoinette’s singing capped two hours of solid performances, as The Voice’s final dozen artists took to the stage, hoping to impress viewers who will whittle the group down to 10.

Likely earning a ticket back next week was soulful Chris Jamison, who had a serious pop star moment singing Nick Jonas’s “Jealous” for Team Adam.

Wearing a black suit and tie that showed off his sleek frame, Jamison worked the stage like a junior Justin Timberlake in a musical moment that seemed a perfect fit for his groove and easy falsetto.

Loving it perhaps the most were the ladies in the crowd, who voiced their approval and would not let up.

“It just showed all the strength of your voice,” Stefani told Jamison. “The screaming in here was so loud, I think I have permanent damage!”

Levine, acknowledging Jamison’s hot looks, was jazzed as his artist had his best performance of the season and opened a lane for himself moving ahead. “Yeah, you’re cute all right … but you’re a talented, talented singer,” Levine enthused.

Other early Season 7 standouts also kept their stock high, including Blake Shelton’s Southern rocker Craig Wayne Boyd. He showed he could helm some classic country on George Strait’s ballad of longing, “You Look So Good in Love.”

Shelton hoped the quieter song would showcase a more tender side of the hunky artist, and Boyd did not disappoint. Even Pharrell Williams stood up to acknowledge the moment. “It was such a clean, super-professional performance,” he told Boyd, as Stefani and Shelton also acknowledged his skill.

Jamaica capture Caribbean Cup in shootout win over Trinidad & Tobago; Union’s Andre Blake makes key save

Jamaica captured the sixth Caribbean Cup title in the country’s history on Tuesday evening, defeating Trinidad & Tobago 4-3 in a penalty shootout after a 0-0 draw, much to the delight of the home fans in Montego Bay.

Philadelphia Union goalkeeper Andre Blake made a key save in the shootout, denying Soca Warriors captain Kenwyne Jones in the first round to stake his side to an early lead. Though D.C. United forward Michael Seaton missed his penalty for Jamaica, a miss from Khaleem Hyland on the final kick gave Jamaica the title.

Orlando City midfielder Kevin Molino and Houston Dynamo defender Jermaine Taylor converted their shootout attempts for T&T and Jamaica, respectively.

The victory guarantees the Reggae Boyz a berth in the 2016 Copa America Centenario, in addition to the 2015 Gold Cup place they earned by making the Caribbean Cup final four. Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago will be joined in next summer’s Gold Cup by Cuba and Haiti, while fifth-placed French Guiana will face Honduras for the remaining spot up for grabs.

A number of MLS players featured for both finalists throughout the tournament, with Blake, Seaton and Taylor joined on the Jamaica squad by Alvas Powell (Portland Timbers), Je-Vaughn Watson (FC Dallas), Darren Mattocks (Vancouver Whitecaps) and Deshorn Brown (Colorado Rapids). On the T&T side, MLS was represented by Molino and Kevan George (Columbus Crew SC), as well as recently-released ex-Whitecaps center back Carlyle Mitchell.

Mattocks and Molino, along with Haiti’s Kervens Belfort, finished as the tournament’s top scorers with three goals apiece over four games.

Assaults on Jamaica Police Officers Up by More Than 40 Percent

The number of attacks on police officers in the 103rd Precinct this year has increased by more than 40 percent, officials said.

The news comes weeks after a man attacked police officers with a hatchet and another officer was attacked with a crowbar by a robber in the neighborhood.

According to police statistics through Nov. 13, 36 officers have been assaulted this year in the 103rd Precinct, an increase of 44 percent compared with the same period last year, when 25 officers were assaulted.

“There is nothing definitive behind the increase, but it is something that we are experiencing right now,” said Deputy Inspector John Cappelmann, commanding officer of the 103rd Precinct, at a recent community council meeting.

The majority of assaults took place when suspects resisted arrest, Cappelmann said. Most did not result in serious injuries.

The most highly publicized incident occurred on Oct. 23, when Zale Thompson, 32, who police said was inspired by radical Islamic groups, attacked four rookie officers posing for a photo on Jamaica Avenue near 162nd Street, hitting Officer Kenneth Healey, 24, in the head with a metal hatchet.

He also wounded Officer Joseph Meeker, 25, in the right arm with another blow.

Meeker was treated and released from the hospital shortly after the attack.

But Healey, who underwent surgery on the day of the attack and is currently recovering at home, will require another surgery in three to six months, Cappelmann said.

“Considering how grievous his injuries were, his recovery so far has been nothing less than miraculous,” Cappelmann said.

“The first thing he asked when he woke up from surgery was if he could still be a police officer.”

Less than three weeks after that attack, another officer, Gobin Raghunath, was struck in the head with a crowbar while he and another lawman were responding to a burglary in progress on Nov. 10, at a house on 142nd Street near 109th Avenue.

“The guy came running down the stairs at full speed at the officers,” Cappelmann said. “He struck one of the officers in the head with a metal crowbar.”

Raghunath was rushed to Jamaica Hospital, and released the same day after getting several stitches, police said.

“It was difficult for our precinct to go through this again,” Cappelmann said.

In April, the inspector said, two officers were also injured after an unlicensed livery cab driver attempted to flee officers and struck them instead. The officers were not seriously hurt, Cappelmann said.

8 things you might not know about Jamaica

Unless you’ve been stuck in a mine shaft or visiting a distant planet for the past few decades, chances are you’ve heard of Bob Marley and Usain Bolt and can identify both as the most famous sons of Jamaican soil.

Beyond reggae and track icons, however, there are many fascinating things less widely known about “Jamrock” that make this island of just 3 million people stand out.

Here are eight things to know for starters:

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